GrantsScotch 1987-small

Not Rum: Grant’s 100th Anniversary Scotch

Grants Scotch 100th Anniversary 1887-1987

Grants Scotch 100th Anniversary 1887-1987

Before becoming a rum fan, I tried my hand at being a “Scotch Snob”. I quickly found becoming a ‘snob’ would be difficult for me because:

1. Scotch can be pretty expensive
2. I really don’t like the taste of most Scotch.

That being said, my good friend Gary IS a full-fledged Scotch Snob (I say that in the best way possible). Well, a year or so ago, Gary was given a box of unopened Scotch bottles/decanters from a friend who’s father had recently passed away. Gary quickly made his way through all of the bottles but one…Grant’s 100th Anniversary Scotch.

This 25-Year-Old Scotch was bottled in 1987 to commerate Grant’s Centennial celebation (1887-1987). The custom, hand-painted decanter/jug shipped in a large, red box. The Royal Doulton commissioned decanter, a bust of William Grant (founder of William Grant & Sons LTD) was designed and modeled by J.G. Tongue. The decrotive jug was still corked and containted it’s original tax seals. Also inside the box was a commerative Centennial celebration certificate and a corked pour-spout for use after opening.

After finding a few unopened versions for sale on-line for upwards of $400 US, I asked Gary again if he indeed still wanted me to open the bottle. Gary unhesitant shouted ‘open it already’. Like a surgeon, I carefully pealed back the tax seal and twisted the cork. As suspected the cork broke off due to dryness. Fortunetly I was able to use a wine opener to pull the remaining cork from the decanter.

On first sip the 43% alcohol seemed hot and fairly unflavorful. Gary reminded me that I should probably add a drop or two of water to help open the Scotch up. Wow, did that make a difference. The 2nd sip was quite different than the 1st. It was filled with a delightful blend of leather, oak and spices. Gone was the hot, semi-burn replaced with a delightful adult taste. Truly a refined taste that served as a historical reminder of previous time and place. Visions of my grandfather came with every sip. Gary, his lovely wife Joan, friends Larry & Elaine and I enjoyed small pours of the Grant’s all night. We enjoyed every drop, so much so that I decided I’d better eat something before attempting to drive home. Overall it was a great experience and I think Gary, Joan, Elaine and Larry for letting me be part of the evening. Cheers!

I found the following information online reguarding “Grant’s 25 Year Old Character Jug Blended Scotch Whiskey‘:

This Character Jug has been filled with a rare blend of malt and grain whiskies which have been aged in oak casks for twenty five years. The William Grant Jug was originally commissioned in 1986 to celebrate the one hundred years since William Grant Laid the foundation stone of his distillery. This Jug has been filled in 1987 to celebrate the 100 years since the first whisky flowed from the stills of William Grant’s distillery and has a special commemorative back stamp.

This Character Jug was designed and hand modelled by J.G. Tongue after an original portrait in the possession of the Grant family. It has been hand-painted by individual craftsmen at the Royal Doulton Potteries, Staffordshire, England. William Grant & Sons are grateful to the curator of The Regimental Museum of The Gordon Highlanders for his assistance.

3 Responses

  1. Tony Barron
    Tony Barron at |

    Very interesting comments, very fortunate fellow , I wish someone would give me a collection like that.
    I too have the same item on which it says that it was presented to the RD collectors club with a Ltd Ed, of 5ooo world wide, is this any different to the one you have?
    My main interest was to determine a market value as I would now like to sell mine.
    Thank you for a amusing story.
    Best regards,
    TonyB

    Reply
  2. James. P. Dieleman
    James. P. Dieleman at |

    I own the bottle in question. The only problem is that the tax stamp split ( is torn) from dryness. The bottle has never been opened. None of the contents have ever been “sampled”.

    Reply

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